#iCare

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A lot of my loved ones (and me at times) never understood why I was waisting my semi-decent brain on something so seemingly superficial like fashion and for a long time I would just say "the heart wants what the heart wants, it's my passion!" and that's true, but it's no longer enough. 
So here we go, I'm going to merge my heart, my brain and my deep empathy (that makes me cry even when the bad guy dies in movies) and challenge it into something good. 

The fashion industry employs more than 70million workers worldwide, it’s a multi trillion dollar industry and yet it exploit it’s workers, ignores basic human rights and is one of the biggest polluters, second only to the oil industry.

Nowadays in our society everything has to be created, produced and sold in the blink of an eye.  Food has become fast food and fashion has become fast fashion.

When you have an online platform (however small it may be) that can reach people world wide you realise you have a responsibility.
As a blogger, you are an intermediary between the brands and the consumers, you are telling people what they should buy and why (although the latter often falls away these days). And I simply cannot justify telling my readers to buy something that has been produced with the blood, sweat and tears of the garment workers, that pollutes the environment and uses natures resources to an excessive extent. 
I cannot justify telling you to buy a cheap pair of jeans that wastes between 11.000 and 22.000 litres of water (the amount needed to produce one pair of jeans!!), harming and potentially killing garment workers with toxic chemicals that pollute water and air, because the latest trend is a-shade-darker-than-the-season-before. 

When I scroll through my social media it seems like I’m being sold the idea that everyday I need something new to have style or be ‘in style’, but by buying as much as is suggested we create a high demand for the producers which they have to compensate with bigger orders down the supply chain and at the same maintain the same cost or even lower it because otherwise the demand will decrease again.

"Out with the old, in with the new" Fashion has become disposable. But fashion should be a celebration of personal style, a fun tool for self-expression, not a restless marathon to keep up a-trend-a-week (imagine that chest pain after finishing a run - not fun). Let’s forget about fast fashion and make it about quality instead of quantity.

As this is very clearly meant to be a fashion blog I have thought a lot about how not to fall into the same trap. Wearing clothes made out of sustainable fabrics and/or under ethical conditions alone doesn’t mean sustainable fashion. Slow fashion is the third key element, otherwise you are creating the demand and ‘forcing’ the brands to produce more and more with prices going down at the expenses of the people (and places) down the supply chain.

The blog will look and feel exactly the same, it will combine my personal style, some humorous and some deeper thoughts, whilst spreading the message of a conscious wardrobe. Fashion should be fun, exciting, and positive but not just on a superficial level. Let’s make a positive impact all the way down the supply chain and on our beautiful world. 

The process might seem very complicated and daring, which is why a lot of people scare away from it, but actually it’s fairly easy as it's just about being mindful. Hopefully I will be able to give you the rest - amazing brands, tips & tricks and ideas to reuse the skeletons in your closet  (just to be clear, I don't mean that literally, but clothes you thought you could never wear again) as well as new outfit ideas.

With this blog and all of it’s contents I pledge that #iCare and I hope you will join me.

I also promise total transparency and I am open to comments, suggestions and discussions as it’s a whole brave new world that I am still exploring and don’t nearly know enough on the subject.


Shirt by H&M conscious collection available in store only made of 65% recycled polyester and post-consumer waste

Jil Carrara